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What is dementia? Well, according to Dementia Australia, it’s a collection of symptoms that affect the brain, rather than being one specific illness. The truth is, not a whole lot is known about the disease that affects in excess of ½ million Australians, according to the latest figures.

As good dementia courses will teach you, it’s a progressive condition that requires round-the-clock care to be provided in its later stages. The question we’ll be addressing here is at what point is it no longer possible for someone with the disease to live an independent life on their own. 

A Certain Amount of Independence Is Possible:

In the initial stages of dementia, it’s very possible for a person with dementia to live an independent life, particularly if sensible precautions are taken, such as having someone trustworthy check in on them on a regular basis. Financial precautions are often a good idea too, especially when patients are still able to make their own decisions.

That said, as dementia courses online show us, this kind of situation is not often able to be maintained for the long term and there does come a point when the cognitive issues associated with dementia become too acute for independent living to be possible. 

  • Basic Decision Making & Self Care

Dementia is so complex that it’s possible to engage in Tafe Courses (Technical & Further Education) dedicated solely to it and the changes that occur in the brain as it progresses can affect basic decision making and self-care. This puts the person in question at the risk of neglecting themselves or in some cases, wandering off and becoming hurt as a result. 

  • An Increased Risk of Falling

Also, because of the fact that it can affect the way a person perceives colour and light, it can greatly increase the risk of falls. And while not maintaining their living conditions or own personal hygiene levels might not seem as dangerous, their health can still be affected by it. 

  • Taking Medication Correctly

Another important element of self-care covered in dementia courses is the need to keep on top of medication properly. Either not taking medication or taking too much can be extremely dangerous, so when this becomes an issue, it’s almost certainly time to start thinking about finding support to help them live their daily lives.

When a person is no longer able to meet their own basic needs when it comes to paying their bills, feeding themselves all those other things we take for granted, it’s important to ensure that help is provided, as their wellbeing is threatened.

Understand Dementia Better With Online Learning From OCA

It’s true to say that dementia is one of the most difficult conditions to live with and understand, but thanks to dementia courses like our Provide Support To People Living With Dementia Certificate, it’s never been more simple, affordable and convenient to develop your understanding of the disease as a professional or family carer. 

This, like all of the online training we offer, is created with the help of industry experts, CPD-approved, video-based for a stress-free learning experience and ability to be paid for in manageable instalments. If you’d like to know more about this, all you need to do is visit us at www.onlinecoursesaustralia.edu.au.

However, to speak to us directly about your requirements or to have anything you’re not sure about clarified, just call us on 1300 611 404 and we’ll do our utmost to assist.


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